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20121204
20121204
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here in washington. it is a heated rivalry. >> bill: even if your team loses, don't you think you would wear the gear? >> i have the hat. i am absolutely loyal. they played a solid game last night. right up until they didn't win. >> they almost won. >> spoken like a true fan. they played a great game until they lost. >> bill: here's what it sounded like on espn right at the end there. >> rejuvenated football in the nation's capital. redskins and giants split. it looks like they've won a game here at fedex field. and all they are is within a game of the division lead. >> bill: 17-16. >> i will say as a giants fan the redskins are a solid contender this year and they have a fabulous rookie quarterback. >> bill: rgiii. >> he's very good. >> bill: there we go. we've got the nats and redskins coming up. whoa suddenly, sports town. >> i wouldn't get too carried away with that. the last couple of games they looked very good. they also lost to the panthers this season and they had some very terrible games. if th
of those who've already died. >> pelley: fascinating, jim, thank you very much. in washington today, the republicans responded to the white house budget plan with a proposal of their own. it would raise the eligibility age for medicare and people on social security would get smaller cost of living increases. unless there's a compromise by the end of this month, taxes will go up automatically for nearly every american. there is a lot at stake. so we asked wyatt andrews to make sense of how these budget plans compare. wyatt? >> reporter: scott, this republican counterproposal today is long on reducing the deficit and saving big on medicare, but it leaves the two sides still hundreds of billions of dollars apart and they are not close on the basic approach to solve the fiscal cliff. in a letter to the president, house republicans called their offer a fair middle ground. it's a ten-year framework that cuts the deficit by $2.2 trillion. it includes $600 billion in health care cuts-- mostly medicare and medicaid-- $300 billion in other mandatory spending and $300 billion in cuts to all ot
massacring his citizens for nearly two straight years. martha raddatz, abc news, washington. >> it's a little hard to believe since tens of thousands of folks have been killed already, use of chemical weapons would be off limits to the syrian regime right now. considering rebels have made advances that may be one of the most powerful weapons the government has in its arsenal right now. again, that's a red line according to the u.s. if chemicals are used, that could draw us into this conflict militarily. that is a whole different level of involvement here, and according to some senior officials, our folks, military have started to run drills in preparation for chemical attacks. that situation growing more serious. >> syria maintaining that they're not preparing for any sort of chemical warfare. though they have begun mixing compounds according to several sources. as she mentioned the sarin gas could be most readily used to fill artillery shells. real quickly, the united nations said monday they're immediately pulling all nonessential employees out of syria because of this new development. >> h
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